Interior Perspectives

Photos of the interior of the Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh.

Dr. James Gregory. He totally looks like he'd beat someone up with a cane.

Dr. James Gregory. He totally looks like he’d beat someone up with a cane

Dr. Richard Bright. His cane is part of the collection I've been curating.

Dr. Richard Bright. His cane is part of the collection I’ve been curating.

Ballroom

Ballroom

New Library

New Library

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New Library

New Library

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Cullen Room

Cullen Room

Nice specs.

Nice specs.

Duncan Room ceiling detail

Duncan Room ceiling detail

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Looking down the Grand Staircase

Looking down the Grand Staircase

Front Library

Front Library

Front Library - where I spend most of my time.

Front Library – where I spend most of my time.

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A very large book

A very large book

Scale model of the RCPE when it was located at

Scale model of the RCPE when it was located at

Snakes and a chicken. I'm going to have to do more research on the symbology...

Snakes and a chicken. I’m going to have to do more research on the symbology…

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3 comments

  1. I see that hand of Mr R. Adam in some of those ceilings! And the New Library is where we went to the concert on Burns Night a few years ago. See you tomorrow. Carl

  2. […] The canes, from left to right, are the Presidential Cane, Holmes’ Cane, Cullen’s Cane, and Bright’s Cane. The Presidential Cane dates to the mid 19th century and is featured in a number of portraits around the Hall, some of which are early photographs of sitting presidents, which are not on display. Holmes’ Cane belonged to an RCPE fellow, Matthew Holmes, who traveled widely and died in New Zealand in the great influenza outbreak of 1918. Cullen’s Cane belonged to the illustrious and influential Dr. William Cullen, who practiced medicine in Edinburgh in the 18th century and was friends with the likes of such Edinburgh literati as David Hume and Adam Smith. Bright’s Cane originally belonged to Dr. Richard Bright, also a fellow of the College, and the man who is considered the father of nephrology (the study of kidney diseases.) There is a wonderful bust of Dr. Bright in the Great Hall, which I featured in my last post. […]

  3. […] The canes, from left to right, are the Presidential Cane, Holmes’ Cane, Cullen’s Cane, and Bright’s Cane. The Presidential Cane dates to the mid 19th century and is featured in a number of portraits around the Hall, some of which are early photographs of sitting presidents, which are not on display. Holmes’ Cane belonged to an RCPE fellow, Matthew Holmes, who traveled widely and died in New Zealand in the great influenza outbreak of 1918. Cullen’s Cane belonged to the illustrious and influential Dr. William Cullen, another RCPE fellow and sometime Sibbald Librarian. Cullen practiced medicine in Edinburgh in the 18th century and was friends with the likes of such Edinburgh literati as David Hume and Adam Smith. Bright’s Cane originally belonged to Dr. Richard Bright, also a fellow of the College, and the man who is considered the father of nephrology (the study of kidney diseases.) There is a wonderful bust of Dr. Bright in the Great Hall, which I featured in my last post. […]

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